Summer & Books: St. Magnus, The Last Viking

Things Visible & Invisible

Inspired by the A to Z Blogging Challenge this past April, I have decided to blog about books for the month of June. I will be sharing tidbits about my own books and the other books on the Catholic Teen Books website.

finalStMagnusFrontCoverSt. Magnus Erlendson was the Earl of Orkney, and he lived from 1106 to about 1115. He is sometimes known as Magnus the Martyr.

His grandparents were Earl Thorfinn and Ingibiorg Finnsdottir. They had two sons, twins: Erlend and Paul. Erlend was Magnus’s father. Other relatives include the Norwegian Kings Olav II and Harald II. You can do an online search and find plenty of interesting historical facts—which I enjoy doing—but nothing compares to stepping into Susan Peek’s novel: St. Magnus, the Last Viking.

About the Book:

Come back in time 900 years, to the fierce and desolate Northern lands, where Norsemen ruled with ax and…

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Who She Was by Stormy Smith Review

Fey's Bookish World

34515672Rate: 5/5 stars

Title: Who She Was           

Author: Stormy Smith

Song Choices:

Ride by Twenty One Pilots

Mess Is MIne by Vance Joy

*I’d like to Thank Stormy me Smith for contacting me and sending me a copy of ‘Who She Was’ in exchange for a review.*

Synopsis

Trevor Adler loathes the music he used to love, but it’s the key to his full-ride scholarship and the ticket away from his dysfunctional parents. To kick off their freshman year, Trevor’s roommate drags him to a frat party, where he ends up face-to-face with his childhood best friend and finds himself entrenched in memories he’d rather forget.

Unable to let Charlie go again without understanding the truth of why she disappeared from his life and chose to become the type of person they always hated, Trevor is relentless in his pursuit of the girl he once knew.

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Book Review of “Dragon’s Keep” by Janet Lee Carey

The Book and Beauty Blog

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A few months ago I reviewed the second book, Dragonswood, in a series by Janet Lee Carey. I wanted to backtrack and read the first one, Dragon’s Keep, because I don’t like to read books out of order. Dragonswood read like a stand alone but I thought that Dragon’s Keep may add something to the story, however, I was disappointed.

*No Spoilers*

The Plot

The story begins with the royal family of Wilde Island, more specifically the princess, Rosalind. Rosalind is special for a couple of reasons. One, she was born with a dragon’s claw instead of a finger on one hand and two, she is destined to fulfill a 600 year old prophecy that claims her family will be restored to their rightful throne and there will be peace with the dragons. However, everything is thrown into chaos when Rosalind is kidnapped by a dragon, taken to…

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This Chick Read: Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth

The Reading Chick

Veronica Roth has taken a creative  left turn out of a dystopian society like Tris and Four inhabited in the Divergent series to a world where your place in society was determined by your currentgift. At least Tris and Four got to choose the world they’d live in, Cyra and Akos’ fate was out of their own control. I am not a woman who likes their path chosen for them so the beginning of this book was a little frustrating for me. Never fear, our hero and heroine soon chose their own paths, and once they did the speed of the story picked up and the reading of it became more enjoyable.

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“The Monster Upstairs” –Another YA Paranormal Hit from Elle Klass

Marcha's Two-Cents Worth

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Elle Klass fans will undoubtedly love “The Monster Upstairs”,  latest in her “Bloodseeker” series set in historic St. Augustine, Florida.

This heart-stopping sequel to the first book in this series, “The Vampires Next Door”, provides a wild ride (some onboard a rather hot werewolf) as the lethal conflict between Bloodseekers and Slayers intensifies. Slayers aren’t alone in their quest; in case you haven’t already guessed, werewolves are likewise engaged in this timeless battle, as well as Light witches and Dark witches, their mysterious ties revealed in this suspenseful Young Adult thriller.  I’m not normally a vampire fan, but Elle’s have a slightly different twist and culture, that makes them more interesting. Especially the Slayers, tasked with keeping them under control or, better yet, eliminated, through individual powers endowed through their amulets.

The author continues her enviable ability to bring vivid and memorable characters to life, as she has…

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Review: The Goldfish Boy by Lisa Thompson

paisleypiranha

piranha stars turquoise 5“Gorgeous and heartbreaking”

About the Book:

Matthew Corbin suffers from severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. He hasn’t been to school in weeks. His hands are cracked and bleeding from cleaning. He refuses to leave his bedroom. To pass the time, he observes his neighbors from his bedroom window, making mundane notes about their habits as they bustle about the cul-de-sac.

When a toddler staying next door goes missing, it becomes apparent that Matthew was the last person to see him alive. Suddenly, Matthew finds himself at the center of a high-stakes mystery, and every one of his neighbors is a suspect. Matthew is the key to figuring out what happened and potentially saving a child’s life… but is he able to do so if it means exposing his own secrets, and stepping out from the safety of his home?

Cover of Lisa Thompson's The Goldfish Boy

Review by Katy Haye:

This was a lovely, quietly powerful read. Matty was…

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The Candy Shop War: Arcade Catastrophe

Library of Cats

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The Candy Shop War: Arcade Catastrophe

Brandon Mull
Shadow Mountain, 2012

From the dust jacket: “Something fishy is going on at the new amusement center in Walnut Hills. The trouble seems linked to the mysterious disappearance of Mozag and John Dart, who have spent their lives policing the magical community. When Nate and his friends are asked to help investigate, they discover kids feverishly playing arcade games in an effort to win enough tickets to redeem one of four stamps: jet, tanks, submarines and racecars.
“Rumor has it that the stamps are definitely worth it. But what do they do?
“The kids soon discover that the owner of Arcadeland is recruiting members for four different clubs. When each club is filled, he will begin his quest to retrieve a magical talisman of almost unimaginable power. With John Dart and Mozag sidelined, will Nate, Summer, Trevor, Pigeon and their new friend…

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Charlie The Tramp (Review) 

miss bossy reviews, adventures and confessions


ABOUT THE BOOK

Charlie the Beaver wants to be a tramp when he grows up. “Tramps don’t have to learn how to chop down trees and how to roll logs and how to build dams. Tramps just tramp around and have a good time. Tramps carry sticks with little bundles tied to them. They sleep in a field when the weather is nice, and when it rains they sleep in a barn.” Charlie sets off with his bundle. But when he hears water trickling, he can’t get to sleep. Will he be able to resist the urge to make it stop? As Grandfather Beaver says, “You never know when a tramp will turn out to be a beaver.”

An American classic is back in a special 50th anniversary hardcover edition.

Winner of the Boys Club of America Junior Book Award, 1968.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Russell Hoban (1925-2011) first became famous…

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Review: The Stars Never Rise & The Flame Never Dies

Meghan's Whimsical Explorations & Reviews

Hello everyone, happy Monday, Happy Thanksgiving to my Canadian friends, I am so thankful to have this day off. To me it should be mandatory that we have a three day weekend every month. Anyways today I’m going to be reviewing The Stars Never RiseThe Flame Never Dies by Rachel Vincent.

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Book Review: Wonder

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Wonder, R.J. Palacio
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“You can’t blend in when you were born to stand out”


Don’t we always say: don’t judge a book by its cover?

Well let’s say that it is more simple said than done.

Auggie, a 10 year-old boy, has been judged by his face for his whole life.

So going to school with hundreds of other kids?

A new step that will change him forever.

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