Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare – Book Review

Thrice Read

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Lady Midnight

By: Cassandra Clare

Rating: 4/5

Emma Carstairs is a warrior, a Shadowhunter, and the best in her generation. She lives for battle. Shoulder to shoulder with her parabatai, Julian Blackthorn, she patrols the streets of Los Angeles, where vampires party on the Sunset Strip, and faeries—the most powerful of supernatural creatures—teeter on the edge of open war with Shadowhunters. When the bodies of humans and faeries turn up murdered in the same way Emma’s parents were when she was a child, an uneasy alliance is formed. This is Emma’s chance for revenge—and Julian’s chance to get back his brother Mark, who is being held prisoner by the faerie Courts. All Emma, Mark, and Julian have to do is solve the murders within two weeks…and before the murderer targets them.

Their search takes Emma from sea caves full of sorcery to a dark lottery where death is dispensed. And…

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The Invention of Hugo Cabret

teen reviewing books

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The Invention of Hugo Cabret is one of the most incredible books I’ve ever read. Brian Selznick seamlessly combines drawings, writing and adventure in a completely unique novel. He works with the history of film to create an entrancing story filled with clockwork and mystery.


The book first caught my eye because of the numerous drawings. I was skeptical as to whether or not it was possible to tell a story through pictures, but Selznick was able to capture my attention right away.

The story starts off with Hugo Cabret, who is a young orphaned boy living in a Paris train station. His father was killed by a fire before the story. Hugo is taken in by his alcoholic uncle, who winds the clocks in the busy train station. Unfortunately, Hugo’s uncle mysteriously disappears, and the task of winding the clocks falls on Hugo’s shoulders.

“If you’ve ever wondered…

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BOOK REVIEW: You Know Me Well by David Levithan and Nina LaCour

Title: You Know Me Well

Author/s: David Levithan and Nina LaCour

Publication Date: June 07, 2016

Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Format: Kindle

Number of Pages: 256

SynopsisWho knows you well? Your best friend? Your boyfriend or girlfriend? A stranger you meet on a crazy night? No one, really?

Mark and Kate have sat next to each other for an entire year, but have never spoken. For whatever reason, their paths outside of class have never crossed.

That is until Kate spots Mark miles away from home, out in the city for a wild, unexpected night. Kate is lost, having just run away from a chance to finally meet the girl she has been in love with from afar. Mark, meanwhile, is in love with his best friend Ryan, who may or may not feel the same way. See Goodreads’ Blurb

My thoughtsI don’t usually give 2 stars or below. but…

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Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Ransom Riggs

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Title: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #1)

Author: Ramson Riggs

Pages: 352

Publisher: Quirk Books

Genre: Yound Adult Fantasy.

What is it about?

A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of curious photographs.

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.


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“I used to dream about escaping my ordinary life, but my life was never ordinary. I had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was.”

Before reading this book I was overwhelmed for it. Just because look…

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Half bad Trilogy by Sally Green

A court of Books and Tea

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This is a book recommendation that I have for you.  This trilogy is about a boy named Nathan that is a witch.

The setting

The story is set in a modern day world, mostly England and other European countries.

The story

The story is about a group of people born in a modern world with normal humans but they are different. This group of people are witches. We have two kind of witches Black and White. Black witches and White witches do not get along. It is known that white witches are good and black are bad. Our main protagonist is born half white and half black. His mother is a white witch and his father a famous “evil” black witch. Before he comes of age and can receive his magical powers he is taken to “the government” of the white witches to do tests to see if he is…

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The Midnight Society Promo

A New Look On Books

TheMidnightSociety-Final2.jpgThe Midnight Society (The Midnight Chronicles #1)
By 
Rhonda Sermon

Genre: YA Urban Fantasy
Release Date: May 15th 2016

Summary from Goodreads:

Witness protection has a protocol for dealing with every situation—except magic. 

Fifteen-year-old Cate’s life has been monitored since her new identity was created five years ago. She’s spent countless hours learning how to deal with potential threats and dangerous situations. None of which is any use when everyone around her is suddenly frozen like statues at the bus stop. 


As Cate attempts to make sense of the frightening scene, a mysterious group of teenagers appear out of thin air. They are intrigued she’s not affected, but focus on completing their deadly mission, using baffling powers before they vanish again. 


When the group seeks her out the next day, Cate is drawn into a world filled with sorcery and time travel. After she accidentally brings a cheerleader back from…

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Mini Reviews – Complex Kids

The Book Addict

Two absolutely beautiful books reviewed today, both about kids who are trying to cope with major changes in their world. Forgetting Foster is about a little boy whose Dad has early-onset Alzheimer’s, while in The Thing About Jellyfish, Suzy is struggling to cope with the random drowning of her best friend. Both books highlight how children deal with complex situations, and reinforce the importance of discussing issues with children rather than letting them glean information from other places.

Forgetting Foster – Dianne Touchell
22nd June 2016, Allen&Unwin
240 pages, 5/5 stars

Foster is a seven year old boy whose father is starting to forget things. He has early-onset Alzheimer’s, but Foster doesn’t really understand what that means, just that his Dad isn’t quite the same anymore. He’s losing his stories. Foster is worried, but no one really wants to tell him what is going on…

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

From Jen's Bookshelf

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This was a book I had started before YALLWEST but unfortunately did not get the chance to finish before the festival. It worked out okay also because I did not end up meeting this author. It also took me about a month to read this book, which for me is a long time to read a book. I kept getting distracted by responsibilities such as papers and exams to study for.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs is about a seventeen year old boy named Jacob who grew up listening to magical tales of his Grandfather’s time at an orphanage on an island off of England. When his Grandfather passes away Jacob goes a little crazy but his parents convince him that his Grandpa had just been telling him stories and that they weren’t true. Believing it will help him move on from his death, Jacob’s dad…

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